Advertisements

Archive for the ‘opinion’ Category

The Folly of a Scheduled Patch Release Cycle

December 11, 2008

A number of years ago, Microsoft led the charge by moving away from a dynamic patch release schedule to a monthly patch release schedule, essentially creating an imposed monthly patch cycle for their customers.  Since then, many other vendors have followed suit.  There are opinions and arguments supporting both a release schedule philosophy as well as a release upon completion philosophy, and today I’m going to outline where I stand on the issue.

(more…)

Advertisements

The Problem With the Liberty Dollar

December 7, 2008

I’m not going to talk about their underlying quest to end the Federal Reserve (with which I wholeheartedly agree), or about their multi-site raid by the FBI last year where all of their current inventory and all of the metals backing the Liberty Dollar warehouse receipts (paper currency) were confiscated.  No, I’m not going to talk about any of their politics or their legal troubles; what I am going to talk about is their currency model.

(more…)

How NOT to Write a Protocol Specification

November 17, 2008

For the last week or so, I’ve been tasked with implementing Application Simulators in the BreakingPoint product for the OWAMP and TWAMP protocols, RFC 4656 and RFC 5357, respectively.  These are honestly two of the most poorly written protocol specifications that I’ve ever read.  Luckily, they’re rather short.  Not only are many parts vague and ambiguous, but some parts read like a stream-of-consciousness dump directly to a text editor.

(more…)

Formal Degrees vs. Certification

August 18, 2008

I’ve never been a fan of most certifications.  I’ve always been even less a fan of formal degrees in education, at least for technology-centric industries.  I’ve always argued that my body of work is my credential, and if a potential employer were to reject my application on the basis that I didn’t have a certain piece of paper, that short-sighted employer wasn’t the type that I wanted to work for anyway.

This article, however, goes even further to suggest that College is a waste of time for an even larger group of people than just the technology-centric industries, and hints at what certifications can accomplish, given that they evolve past most of my objections with them, which are echoed throughout the article.

(more…)

DEFCON 16

August 14, 2008

DEFCON is always entertaining as it’s the largest hacker conference in North America. Back to back with it’s corporate counterpart, Black Hat, it generally draws thousands of hacker-type people to Las Vegas every summer. The related parties, shenanigans, and drama surrounding it are legendary, and this year was no different.

Below are my thoughts on the talks I was able to attend.

(more…)

How to Really Fix Your DNS

July 25, 2008

Obviously the first thing everyone should be doing is to apply the patches that the major vendors rolled out, and do it quickly.  It is no longer the time for debate in regard to whether or not you really do need to patch… the answer to that question is quite clear; Yes.  Yes you do. Stop reading this, go to your vendor right now, and get the patches. Then apply them.  This will still be here when you get back…

Unfortunately, the existing patch doesn’t really fix the problem, it just makes it much harder to attack, which is a good thing.  If you still aren’t patched, you obviously didn’t follow my instructions in the first paragraph, so I’ll reiterate: Stop reading this, go to your vendor right now, and get the patches. Then apply them.

The patches that most major vendors rolled out when this vulnerability was announced, albeit with no technical details, primarily revolves around randomizing the source port that the nameserver makes it’s queries from.  Without this randomization, the only other piece of random information in the DNS packet is the transaction ID, which DNS servers use to correlate queries and replies, and also helps prevent reply-spoofing attacks by requiring that the attacker correctly guess this value.  Given the randomized hostname exploitation technique used in this attack, the attacker can force the nameserver to do as many queries as they like, which provides a birthday attack scenario for guessing the transaction ID value and succeeding in spoofing the reply.  The search space of the transaction ID is 16 bits, which provides possible values of 0-65535 within which the attacker has to guess correctly.  Given as many attempts as the attacker likes, this can take anywhere from a few seconds to a couple of minutes.  By adding the source port randomization to the picture, this adds around another 16 bits to the equation (minus source ports already used, privileged source port range, etc.), making the time it takes to correctly guess much longer, but still not impossible.

(more…)

Padding the Numbers: Vulnerability Duplication

June 26, 2008

Recently the OSVDB Blog had an interesting article regarding vulnerability duplication via the “hazard of 0day” wherein a vulnerability being exploited in the wild was mistaken for a new vulnerability when in fact it was not.  This caused many of the vulnerability database vendors to issue new IDs, send out threat warnings, bring in the livestock from the impending storm, and so forth.  The resulting fallout from realization that it in fact was not a new vulnerability ranged in varying degrees between one vendor’s complete backtrack and removal of the vulnerability from their database to another vendor’s nearly ignoring the mistake altogether.

While this is definitely a serious problem, resulting in various degrees of erroneous or duplicated vulnerability information, it’s not nearly as bad as the real topic of this post, intentional vulnerability duplication.

(more…)

CSI-SX 2008

April 30, 2008

CSI-SX is the new branding for the CSI NetSec conference, which is co-located with Interop Las Vegas, and is essentially the security-focused portion of the overall conference. As with the annual CSI conference, this conference targets a different demographic than I’m used to speaking for as the attendance is usually comprised of very large enterprise and government employees and I usually speak for conferences targeted at the research and hacker communities.

The night before the first day of conference sessions a speaker reception was held which I attended. I met a number of people from the conference staff whom I had not met before as well as a few of the other speakers. Surprisingly I was well-received by this crowd, even with my spiked green hair, which I’m sure they don’t see a lot of at this type of conference.

Below are my thoughts on the couple of talks I was able to attend.

(more…)

ToorCon Seattle 2008

April 22, 2008

The ToorCon organization puts on some of the best conferences in my opinion, and this last weekend was version 1.0 of their Seattle conference (beta was last year, which I also attended). Friday night was entirely 5-minute lightning talks and then Saturday was entirely 20-minute turbo talks. Sunday was workshops, which unfortunately I could not attend since I had to fly back to Austin mid-day. Last year was invite only and if you were there last year you received a coupon code for a discounted rate this year ($300), otherwise it was a little expensive to attend ($1000). Overall there were a number of excellent speakers with excellent content.

Due to the sheer number of talks (and I did see all of them), I’ll only cover the ones I found most interesting below:

(more…)

CSI 2007

November 8, 2007

CSI 2007 was the first time I’ve ever attended a CSI conference. I was actually a CSI member way back in the day when I was running my own consulting firm and needed as many business development avenues to explore as possible, but after closing my consultancy and going back to work for The Man(tm) I didn’t keep up my membership as I really wasn’t getting much out of the organization at that point. For some reason I had never attended any of their conferences. The CSI Annual Conference is billed as “The leading management, strategy and policy event for today’s security professionals”, so it’s a very different conference from what I’m used to. While I generally attend the more technical events, this one was targeted at an entirely different demographic. There was a lot of large enterprise and government presence, and I got plenty of scowls as people noticed my green hair, but in the end I believe I won most of them over…

The evening of my talk there was also a Capture the Flag game. Unfortunately I wasn’t aware of this until I ran into Dave Aitel that evening and he told me about it, or I would have had my laptop with me and been prepared to compete. This game was essentially a race through various goals with clues and hints along the way. The guy that won achieved the final goal at just under 2 hours. One potential vulnerability that I pointed out to the event organizers was that most of the information was given away to the audience in the observation room near the start of the competition, and had the competition not been 3 floors underground where there was no cellular signal, I could have easily relayed the information to Dave’s mobile via SMS or AIM or something. Had we had some other form of local wireless communication, cheating would have been trivial. Perhaps next time they’ll not give away so much information at the beginning to the audience…

Below are my thoughts on the couple of talks I was able to attend. Unfortunately I was only there for the one day that I was speaking and I was busy preparing to speak and recording a shorter version of my talk to actually attend many of them.

(more…)