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Nakamoto Family Foundation

July 7, 2018

Over what now approaches a decade since Satoshi first published the Bitcoin white paper there has been continued speculation of who might be Satoshi. Over time, various people—myself included—have been imagined to be Satoshi for various reasons. Certain would-be Satoshis have made attempts to claim that they are Satoshi. Unfortunately some have even been so persistent in their claims that they have been able to confuse newcomers to the distributed ledger and blockchain space and have been able to get seats on conference panels using these claims. Last week was the most recent version of this with the release of an excerpt from a book that accompanied a website, allegedly in advance of a forthcoming book.

Let me be clear: All of the information that relates to me in this published excerpt from the book can be sourced either from the emails that I published previously in my “I am Not Satoshi” blog post or can be sourced from conversations that I had with Satoshi on public forums in the earliest days of the Bitcoin project. The author does demonstrate some knowledge around software development and debugging in his synthesis of Satoshi and I’s published interactions, but this proves nothing. The excerpt (and presumed forthcoming book) strikes me more like an extremely well researched piece of performance art or first-person fan fiction than any new revelation-containing update or direct claim of the Satoshi identity.

I would also expect the real Satoshi to both be capable of devising and have the desire to publish a much more challenging crypto puzzle than the one accompanying the excerpt on the website.

Unless the real Satoshi has since destroyed the relevant private keys, it should be really straightforward for the real Satoshi—should he/she/they ever decide to go public—to make it absolutely certain that their words are their own: sign a message with Satoshi’s PGP key or presumed early bitcoin key(s). That’s the only proof that I’ll accept, and I advise you to demand the same of anyone’s claim to the Satoshi identity.

The author of this excerpt has not done that, nor has anyone else since the real Satoshi went dark.

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ExploitHub Evolved

July 4, 2017

Knowing when to call it quits or pivot is an important life skill.  Unfortunately, this time has come for ExploitHub.  From the recently updated ExploitHub.com:

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KetoSweets.blog

June 27, 2017

Are you interested in trying a ketogenic diet but don’t want to give up your sweets?  Are you actively maintaining a ketogenic diet but keep derailing your ketosis because you cheat too much with the sugar?  Then have I got a new Thing for you!

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BodyHacking Con Blog

September 14, 2015

Hey blog readers!  I just wanted to post here that I’m now contributing to the BodyHacking Con’s blog.  I’ll be writing primarily about my own personal experiences in the realm of bodyhacking, with my first post being about Nootropics, the Alchohol Flush Reaction, and the ALDH2 Gene.

I Am Not Satoshi

November 26, 2013

There has been a lot of speculation recently regarding whether or not I am Satoshi Nakamoto, the infamous creator of Bitcoin, and more recently whether or not a Bitcoin address which I control was used to fund the Silk Road marketplace.  I would like to address these two issues now and hopefully put them to rest.

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REcon 2012

June 19, 2012

I’ve just recently returned from REcon 2012 and while I heard a couple people express that they had “heard” that some people were more disappointed with this year’s conference compared to prior ones, I personally really enjoyed it and felt it was the best one yet.  I saw and enjoyed more of the lectures this year than I have in the past and seemed to have better interactions with the other conference attendees, better conversations, and generally enjoyed myself more than years past.  Perhaps it was because this year Montreal wasn’t in the middle of a heat wave with no air conditioning in the hotel and the conference hotel didn’t catch fire (:

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InfoSec Southwest 2012 Debrief

April 11, 2012

ISSW 2012 LogoA couple of weekends ago I hosted my first information security and hacking conference called InfoSec Southwest here in Austin, Texas.  Having been attending such conferences for over fifteen years, and being involved with those in such capacities as speaker, volunteer, and sponsor, I had a general idea of the amount of work that this undertaking would be and luckily I wasn’t too far off in my estimation.  Had this been much more work than I had expected, I just might have keeled over and died from over-stimulation and exhaustion…

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ExploitHub

February 29, 2012

ExploitHub LogoA few years ago, following the failure of WabiSabiLabi’s 0day auction site, I gave some thought to how to create a public marketplace for exploits that actually works.  Obviously given the example of WabiSabiLabi and a little common sense that any vulnerability researcher worth their salt would know, you can’t have a public market for 0day vulnerabilities.  As WabiSabiLabi quickly found out, by disclosing enough information about the vulnerability so that a potential customer can make a determination about whether or not to buy it, you’re likely giving up enough information about the vulnerability for them to find it themselves, given varying levels of time and effort.  Thus, you can really only market 0day to trusted customers and when your marketplace is open to the public, your customers are most definitely not trusted and consists of various demographics who have lots of disposable time on their hands to go hunt down your vulnerabilities.  So, what if we remove 0day from the equation entirely I thought? Could an open market for exploits of public vulnerabilities work? Would anyone actually buy such exploits?  ExploitHub was born, and it turns out the answer is yes.

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TSA Lectures, Lies, and Rude, Dismissive Behavior

February 21, 2012

On a recent trip to Orlando, I opted out of the full-body scan at AUS, as I always do at every airport security checkpoint.  While waiting for my pat-down, I was lectured by the TSA gate agent about how safe they are, was subsequently questioned about my cellphone use as a radiation exposure comparison, and was subjected to repeated attempts to get me to change my mind and just go through the scanner.

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InfoSec Southwest 2012

February 14, 2012

InfoSec Southwest 2012 LogoA few years ago, the idea came up at our local AHA! meeting that our group should host an information security and/or hacking conference here in Austin, Texas.  Some venue ideas were tossed around, some preliminary cost research done, but the idea never went much beyond that due to a number of reasons, foremost of which is that AHA! folk are very, very busy people, myself included.  Back then, none of us simply had the time or resources to make such an undertaking happen.  Fortunately, while I still don’t really have the time personally, I now have the resources in the way of paid staff that I can have plan and execute such an event, so mid-2011 or so I decided to do so.

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